Open Source

Week11: 3d printing is the next to go…

Posted on

Screen Shot 2017-10-10 at 11.38.06 am

Screen Shot 2017-10-10 at 11.37.25 am

Screen Shot 2017-10-10 at 11.37.04 am

So a development in idea process. Instead of a mannequin-like set up that is showcasing technology dying into itself, I’m focusing on a particular technology that is new, but will end up dead. 3D Printing.

Everyone says how this is the next big thing, but track record of emerging technology suggests otherwise. I want to showcase this physically. Take out the mannequin hand that is looking for the next technology to sabotage, and use my 3D printed prosthesis. Then with the kumi, project onto the hand the STL code from the file I got it with. Essentially, the 3D printed hand is a piece of code taken a physical form. This will act as a catalyst for the humanisation of a device.

The dead technology will still sit behind it, however the idea is that the 3D printing phenomena is the “killer” in the momentum of futures. The STL code will loop over a period of time to show all components that go into the piece. The question I want to address is how can we stop this trend? Is a trend of the new futures going to be how quickly we can move onto the next emerging technology?

Iteration and installation will happen next week, this week I just sat within the space and literally looked at the devices. Questioned the motifs behind what it really is I want to understand and was really effective. I want to mind map this all out and basically just throw it up. The aesthetic nature comes last now.

Advertisements

Comfort or Freedom? The Smartphone Future

Posted on Updated on

One of the hardest decisions when walking into a communications store is which brand of phone is best for the type of content and use the user will produce. Two of the giants of this market are Apple and Android. The main difference between these two are apple being a Closed source platform, and the android being open source, which explains the way the device and services can be accessed, modified and used.

When the iPhone was released, Steve Jobs released a philosophy detailing his disinterest with the flow of content amoungst multiple platforms being available on his device. The app market for both platforms is a great example, as the android market allows user input with no gatekeepers to content, where As detailed by Jonathan Zittrain, ”   the App Store has a catch: app developers and their software must be approved by Apple. If Apple does not like the app, for any reason, it is gone.”

The info-graphic I created is a simple comparison of known facts about both companies. I personally own an iPhone, however with these figures and statistics, it’s not hard to see why perhaps my next upgrade could follow the trend of freedom in the android market.

Open